What to Bring

Travelers to Morocco must possess a passport valid for six months from the date of entry into the country. Visas are not required for American tourists traveling in Morocco for less than 90 days.

For longer stays, Americans are required to obtain a residence permit and a special visa. For additional information, travelers may contact

Embassy of Morocco
1601 21st St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 462-7979

It’s a good idea to make a photocopy of your passport, carried separately, in case of any emergency.

For more info about Visa to Morocco, please visit:

http://wafin.com/consulate/consulate.phtml?action=detail&cid=13

Health Preparations:

Morocco is quite safe from a health point of view; however, some precautions will ensure a healthy, enjoyable trip. No immunizations are required to enter Morocco, but it is recommended that visitors see their physician to make sure their inoculations are up-to-date.

Packing:

In general, less is more. And for the shopping-minded, the less you bring, the more you can bring home!

Moroccans are very accustomed to Western travelers in their midst, particularly in the larger cities. Yet Morocco remains a fairly conservative society in terms of dress. Moroccans do not wear t-shirts or shorts except for sport or at the beach. Light, cotton or linen pants, skirts, and long sleeve shirts will help ensure you have a pleasant travel experience.

It’s also a good idea to pack such items as a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen, backup medical prescriptions, a Swiss Army knife, earplugs, and a good book (English-language books can be difficult to find in Morocco.)

Depending on where you’re traveling in the country, and when, you can encounter some cool or downright chilly conditions. Please see the climate section, and plan accordingly.

Many travelers bring a few colored pens, or hard candies, to give to children who may lead you through a village or otherwise approach you.

Money:

The Moroccan unit of currency is the dirham, pronounced “deer ram” and abbreviated “dh”. At the time of this writing there were about 11 dirham to the U.S. Dollar. You can check the latest rates on the Internet.

While there are extraordinary palatial hotels and restaurants rivaling any found in the West, in general, most travelers will find Morocco a very reasonable country, cost-wise. Many amenities, such as newspapers, cost roughly what they would at home, while there are many delightfully inexpensive surprises. (One can hardly surpass a 2.5 dh glass of freshly squeezed orange juice in Marrakesh’s Djemma-el-Fna square.)

Most finer hotels, higher-end restaurants, and even many stalls in the souks of Marrakesh and Fez take credit cards. The most popular are Visa and Mastercard.
Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs) are widely available throughout Morocco, although many charge high fees for international with drawls. Also be aware that in the outlying areas, ATMs that accept international cards can be difficult to find.

The most popular and safe money option is usually travelers cheques, which are accepted widely throughout the country. A couple of suggestions are in order however: first, bring fewer, higher-denomination checques, as many Bureaus des Change and banks charge a flat, per-checque fee for cashing. Also, many merchants will accept cheques, but be sure to agree on an exchange rate first. There’s a big difference paying with a travelers checque valued at 11 dh/dollar and one valued at 10.

When cashing traveler’s cheque, be sure to keep your receipt! You are only allowed by law to change back 50% of your dirhams back into another currency, and in order to do so, you must present the exchange slip. It is illegal to export dirhams from Morocco.

Electric Appliances:

Morocco uses French-style 110/220 volt electrical plugs. If you want to bring a laptop, electric shaver, or other appliances, you will need a plug adapter. The adapter you’re looking for looks something like this:

Travel Insurance:

It’s inexpensive, and it can protect you in case of an emergency, or if your travel plans suddenly change. Travel insurance is just a good idea. There are many places on the Internet where you can compare rates and buy.